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Saturday, April 25, 2009

Mutant materials in contemporary design | Paola Antonelli, editor | Museum of Modern Art, publisher | 1995 | PART 3

Mutant materials in contemporary design, Paola AntonelliPaola Antonelli
The Museum of Modern Art, United States of America, 1995

What follows is an alphabetical listing by designer of the rubber and foam items in the “Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design” exhibition.  The date of manufacture is followed by design development date in parentheses.

Ron Arad. British, b. Israel 1951
“Misfits” Sofa. (1993) pp. 74-75
ICI Waterlily™ foam and upholstery fabric
Prototype by Moroso S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Moroso S.p.a., Cavalicco, Italy

Avocet, Inc.
Marty Holloway. American, b. 1964
Gary Erickson. American, b. 1957
“02 Air 40” Bicycle Saddle. 1992 (1991) p. 70
Closed-cell polyurethane foam, titanium, impact-modified nylon shell, and Lycra® cover
“02 AirGel 50” Bicycle Saddle. 1992 (1991) p. 70
Closed-cell polyurethane foam, gel, titanium, impact-modified nylon shell, and Lycra® cover
Manufactured by Avocet, Inc., United States
Lent by Avocet, Inc., Palo Alto

G. Michael Christy. American, b. 1945
“Reflex Exercise Putty. 1991 (1991)
“Ultralite Sports Putty. 1991 (1991)
“Rebound Putty. 1991 (1991)
Polymers of silicone rubber and emollients
Manufactured by The Christy Company, United States
Lent by The Christy Company, Pleasanton, Calif.

Aubert Y. Coran. American, b. 1932
Raman P. Patel. American, b. 1936
Sabet Abdou-Sabet. American, b. 1937
“Santoprene®” Thermoplastic Elastomer Pellets. 1981 (1981) p. 80
Elastomeric alloy/thermoplastic vulcanizate made from cross-linked polypropylene and EPDM (ethylene-polypropylene-diene monomer) rubber
Manufactured by Advanced Elastomer Systems, L.P., United States
Lent by Advanced Elastomer Systems, L.P., St. Louis, Mo.

Design Continuum, Inc.
David Chastain. American, b. 1952
Andrew Jones. American, b. 1959
Harvey Koselka. American, b. 1964
Carl Madore. American, b. 1966
“Airflex” Baseball Glove. 1991 (1991) p. 71
Lycra®-covered neoprene, RF (radio-frequency) welded polyurethane air system, and full-grain leather shell and liner
Manufactured by Spalding Sports Worldwide, United States
Lent by Design Continuum, Inc., Boston

Dynamic Systems, Inc.
“Sun-Mate” and “Pudgee” Foam Cushionings. 1978 (1978) p. 78
Open-cell high-performance polymeric foam containing 50% vegetated plant materials
Manufactured by Dynamic Systems, Inc., United States
Lent by Dynamic Systems, Inc., Leicester, N.C.

frogdesign
Binoculars.
1990 (1988) p. 80
Injection-molded polymers, elastomers, and other materials
Manufactured by Carl Zeiss Ferngläser, Germany
Lent by frogdesign, Sunnyvale, Calif., and Carl Zeiss Ferngläser, Aalen, Germany

GVO, Inc.
Michael Barry. American, b. 1956
Shawn Hanna. Canadian, b. 1969
Jay Wilson. American, b. 1941
“i/O” Personal Digital Assistant. (1994) p. 80
Insert-molded Santoprene® thermoplastic elastomer over injection-molded ABS
Prototype
Lent by GVO, Inc., Palo Alto

Hella Jongerius. Dutch, b. 1963
“DD 09 Soft Vases.” (1994)
Molded soft polyurethane
Prototypes
Lent by Droog Design Foundation, Voorburg, The Netherlands

Masayuki Kurokawa. Japanese, b. 1937
“Gom” Pens. 1992 (1992) p. 85
Injection-molded synthetic rubber, stainless steel, and brass
“Gom” Push Pins and Magnets. 1985 (1984) p. 85
Injection-molded synthetic rubber and stainless steel
Manufactured by Fuso Gum Industry Co., Ltd., Japan
Lent by Masayuki Kurokawa, Tokyo

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of California
“Aerogel” Insulating Material. 1987 (1987)
Silica
Manufactured by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, United States
Lent by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of California, Livermore, Calif.

Ross Lovegrove of Studio X. British, b. 1958
Stephen Peart of Vent Design. British, b. 1958
Knoll In-house Design Team
“Surf Collection” Lumbar Support. 1994 (1994) p. 78
Molded Gecet™ (high-memory thermoreactive polyurethane foam), neoprene, nylon, and die-cast zinc counterweight
Manufactured by The Knoll Group, United States
Lent by The Knoll Group, New York

MAP International
Christopher Connell. Australian, b. 1954
“Pepe” Chair. 1993 (1992) p. 75
Injection-molded CFC (chlorofluorocarbon-free) flexible polyurethane foam, self-skinning polyurethane, wool upholstery, steel-spring support, and steel frame
Manufactured by MAP (Merchants of Australian Products Pty., Ltd.), Australia
Lent by MAP, Melbourne

Nike Product Design
“Nike-Air” Athletic Shoe Cushionings:
“Air Max2,” “Blow-molded Technology Cushioning,” “Flexile-Air,” and “Low-pressure Nike-Air®.” 1994 (1993) pp. 71-72
Blow-molded urethane
“Nike-Air Tensile-Air” Cushioning. 1994 (1993) pp. 71-72
Urethane film and three-dimensional mesh fabric
“Air Go LWP (LightWeight Performance) Athletic Shoe (section). 1994 (1994) pp. 71-72
Solid-rubber outsole, Phylon® (ethylvinylacetate) foam midsole, “Visible Air™” heel, “Tensile-Air™ “ forefoot, and synthetic rubber
“Regrind” Rubber. 1992 (1992)
Granulated and separated elastomer obtained from recycled athletic-shoe soles
“Air Moc” Shoe. 1994 (1994)
Full-grain leather, neoprene, synthetic leather, thermoplastic rubber, and Regrind rubber
Manufactured by Nike, Inc., United States
Lent by Nike, Inc., Beaverton, Ore.

Michele Popp-Saward. American, b. 1968
“Image Pro®” Bicycle Helmet. 1993 (1993)
In-mold Microshell® expanded-polystyrene foam liner, insert-molded polycarbonate shell, and nylon webbing
Manufactured by Bell Sports, Inc., United States
Lent by Bell Sports, Inc., Los Gatos, Calif.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop
Renzo Piano. Italian, b. 1937
Noriaki Okabe. Japanese, b. 1947
Kansai International Airport Lobby Seating. 1994 (1993) pp. 76-77
Molded polyurethane foam, steel, aluminum, artificial leather with proteins, and beech-veneer plywood
Manufactured by Okamura Corporation, Japan
Lent by Okamura Corporation, Tokyo

Marc Sadler. French, b. 1946
“Drop 1” and “Drop 2” Lighting Fixtures. 1994 (1993) p. 79
Injection-molded silicon-elastomer diffusers and Lexan® polycarbonate wall mounts
Manufactured by Arteluce (a division of Flos S.p.a.), Italy
Lent by Flos S.p.a., Brescia, Italy
Motorcyclist's “Bap” Back Protector. 1993 (1992) p. 84
Expanded-polyethylene base, low-memory-foam inner padding, expanded-polyurethane pads, and polypropylene cup protector
Manufactured by Dainese S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Dainese S.p.a., Molvena, Italy

Sensa Design
Boyd Willat. American, b. 1943
“Sensa Pen. 1994 (1993)
Injection-molded Plasmium™ gel grip, silicone jacket, and aluminum-and-brass-alloy interior
Manufactured by Willat Writing Instruments, United States
Lent by Willat Writing Instruments, Los Angeles

Smart Design
Stephan Allendorf. American, b. 1954
Michael Callahan. American, b. 1965
Dan Formosa. American, b. 1953
Steven Russak. American, b. 1962
Davin Stowell. American, b. 1953
Tucker Viemeister. American, b. 1948
“Good Grips” Utensils. 1989 (1989) p. 81
Injection-molded Santoprene® and other materials
Manufactured by OXO International, United States
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gifts of the designers

Wayman R. Spence. American, b. 1934
“UltraSoft® Blue Gel Bicycle Comfort Pad.” 1994 (1994)     p. 70
Thermo-injected UltraSoft (viscoelastic-polymeric) gel
Manufactured by WRS Sportsmed (a division of the WRS Group, Inc.), United States
Lent by the WRS Group, Inc., Waco, Tex.

Vent Design
Stephen Peart. British, b. 1958
Bradford Bissell. American
“Animal” Wet Suit. 1989 (1988) pp. 82-83
Molded neoprene, thermoplastic elastomer, nylon jersey, and Delrin® zipper
Manufactured by O'Neill, Inc., United States
Lent by Vent Design, Campbell, Calif.

Virtual Studio
Peter Stathis. American, b. 1960
“Thumb Sparing” Ski-pole Grip. (1991) p. 81
Double-shot injection-molded Santoprene®
Prototype
Lent by Peter Stathis, Philadelphia

References

Antonelli, P., ed. (1995). Mutant materials in contemporary design. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art, NY.

Antonelli, P., (1995). Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Museum of Modern art Web site: http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/1995/mutantmaterials/checklist.html


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Thursday, April 23, 2009

Mutant materials in contemporary design | Paola Antonelli, editor | Museum of Modern Art, publisher | 1995 | PART 2

Mutant materials in contemporary design, Paola AntonelliPaola Antonelli
The Museum of Modern Art, United States of America, 1995

What follows is an alphabetical listing by designer of the plastic items in the “Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design” exhibition.  The date of manufacture is followed by design development date in parentheses.

AT&T Global Information Solutions Design Integrity Center
Donald Carr of AT&T Consulting Design Group. American, b. 1959
“PalmMouse” Computer Pointing Device. (1992) p. 32
Injection-molded polycarbonate body, Santoprene® thermoplastic elastomer saddle, and copper and acetate antenna
Prototype by AT&T Global Information Solutions, United States
Lent by Donald Carr, Dayton, Ohio

Ron Arad. British, b. Israel 1951
“Bookworm” Bookshelves. 1994 (1993)
Bulk-dyed extruded and injection-molded thermoplastic polymer
Manufactured by Kartell S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Kartell S.p.a., Milan

Authentics artipresent GmbH
Hans Maier-Aichen. German, b. 1940
“LIP” Wastepaper Baskets. 1993 (1993)
Injection-molded polypropylene
Manufactured by Authentics artipresent GmbH, Germany
Lent by Authentics artipresent GmbH, Holzgerlingen, Germany

Bausch & Lomb Product Development
“Killer Loop Xtreme Pro” Sunglasses. 1994 (1994) p. 23
DiamondHard® (amorphous-diamond) coating on die-cast polycarbonate lenses and Megol® elastomer
Manufactured by Bausch & Lomb, Inc., United States
Lent by Bausch & Lomb, Inc., Rochester, N.Y.

Santina Bonini. Italian, b. 1961
Ernesto Spicciolato. Italian, b. 1957
“Arctic Series” Bathroom Accessories. 1994 (1994)
Polyester resin
Manufactured by Gedy S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Gedy, S.p.a., Varedo, Italy

Chevron Chemical Co.
Polyethylene Pellets. 1984 (1984)
Manufactured by Chevron Chemical Co., United States
Lent by Chevron Chemical Co., Orange, Tex.

Antonio Citterio. Italian, b. 1950
Glen Oliver Löw. German, b. 1959
“Mobil” Container System. 1994 (1993) p. 29
Bulk-dyed thermoplastic polymer containers and chrome- or aluminum-colored steel frame and handles
Manufactured by Kartell S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Kartell S.p.a., Milan

Celina Clarke. Australian, b. 1967
Simon Christopher. Australian, b. 1967
“Madame Ruby” Lighting Fixture. 1994 (1994)
Compression-molded recycled polycarbonate-acrylic automotive taillights
Manufactured by ism objects, Australia
Lent by ism objects, Australia

Gino Colombini. Italian, b. 1915
Wastebaskets. 1993 (1968) p. 40
Injection-molded 100% recycled plastics
Manufactured by Kartell S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Kartell S.p.a., Milan

Domus Academy Research Center
Karim Azzabi, Michele Barro, Esperanza Nunez Castain, Anna Castelli Ferrieri, Antonio Petrillo, and Andres Salas Acosta
“Neolite” Multipurpose Material. 1991 (1991) p. 40
100% heterogeneous recycled plastics
Manufactured by Montedipe/RPE (now Consortium Replastic), Italy
Lent by Domus Academy, Assago, Italy, and Consortium Replastic, Rome

Du Pont Polymer Products
Delrin®
Acetal-elastomer-thermoplastic alloy
Rynite®
Polyester-elastomer blend
Zytel®
Nylon-elastomer blend
Manufactured by Du Pont Polymer Products, United States
Lent by Du Pont Polymer Products, Wilmington, Del.

Renate Eilert. German, b. 1964
“Bzzuno” Syringe. (1990)
Injection-molded polypropylene housing, stainless-steel needle, and rubber piston ring
Prototype by Neste Oy, Finland, and Renate Eilert Design, France
Lent by Renate Eilert, Vallans, France

EnviroSafe Products, Inc.
DuraPlast. 1989 (1989) p. 40
High-density and low-density recycled plastics
EnviroBoard. 1989 (1989) p. 40
Recycled plastics and wood-dust composite
Manufactured by EnviroSafe Products, Inc., United States
Lent by EnviroSafe Products, Inc., New York

Bob Evans. American, b. 1950
“Tan Delta Force Fin®” Diving Fins. 1994 (1994) p. 23
Liquid-cast heat-cured Uniroyal flexible polyurethane
Manufactured by Bob Evans Designs, Inc., United States
Lent by Bob Evans Designs, Inc., Santa Barbara

Joseph Forakis. American, b. 1962
“Havana” Hanging Lighting Fixture. 1993 (1993)
Blown polyethylene
Manufactured by Foscarini Murano S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Foscarini Murano S.p.a., Italy

frogdesign
“Ultratech” Orthopedic Knee Brace. 1992 (1991)
Injection-molded post-formable polycarbonate
Manufactured by Biedermann Motech GmbH, Germany
Lent by frogdesign, Sunnyvale, Calif., and Biedermann Motech GmbH, Schweningen, Germany

Donald Terry Goodall. British, b. 1924
Threadless Medical Specimen Container. 1994 (1993)
Injection-molded polypropylene
Manufactured by Lekod Pty., Ltd., Australia
Lent by Donald Goodall, Blakehurst, Australia

Laura Handler. American, b. 1954
Dennis Decker. American, b. 1954
Amanda Honig Magalhaes. American, b. 1968
“Gallery Glass” Goblets. 1993 (1992) p. 22
Die-cast, ultrasonic-sealed acrylic resin
Manufactured by Metrokane, Inc., United States
Lent by Metrokane, Inc., New York

IDEO Product Development
Paul Bradley. American, b. 1960
Lawrence Lam. American, b. 1960
“3-D Mouse” Computer Pointing Device. 1991 (1991) p. 33
Injection-molded ABS (acrylonitrite-butadene-styrene)
Manufactured by Logitech, Inc., United States
Lent by Logitech, Inc., Fremont, Calif.

IDEO Product Development
Tim Brown. British, b. 1962
Naoto Fukasawa. Japanese, b. 1956
Paul Howard. American, b. 1955
Computer Processor Stand. 1991 (1990) p. 37
Injection-molded high-impact polystyrene
Manufactured by Technology Molded Plastics (now Hartzell, Inc.), United States
Lent by Details, New York

IDEO Product Development
Christopher Lada. American, b. 1952
Christopher Loew. American, b. 1963
Lawrence Schubert. American, b. 1962
“Proset” Professional Telephone Headset. 1993(1991) p. 33
Injection-molded ABS-polycarbonate blend, acetal, insert-molded thermoplastic elastomers, stainless steel, and brass
Manufactured by Unex Corporation, United States
Lent by IDEO Product Development, Palo Alto

Yoshiyuki Kondo of Kondo Eye Institute. Japanese, b. 1955
Tsutomu Sunada of IOL Division, Nidek Co., Ltd. Japanese, b. 1963
Yuji Tsuchikawa of IOL Division, Nidek Co., Ltd. Japanese, b. 1949
One-piece Posterior Chamber Lens with UV-absorbing NR-84K Lens.
Perspex® PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate)
Manufactured by Nidek Co., Ltd., Japan
Lent by Nidek Co., Ltd., Aichi, Japan

Masayuki Kurokawa. Japanese, b. 1937
“Fieno” Scuba (Self-contained Underwater Re-Breathing Apparatus). 1994 (1993) p. 39
Injection-molded polycarbonate-polyester blend
Manufactured by Grand Bleu, Inc., Japan
Lent by Masayuki Kurokawa, Tokyo

Stefan Lindfors. Finnish, b. 1962
“Oil” One-liter and Four-liter Gasoline Cans. (1993) p. 38
Blow-molded polyethylene
Prototype by Neste Oy, Finland
Lent by Stefan Lindfors, Kansas City, Mo.

MAP International
Christopher Connell. Australian, b. 1954
“Plaky” Table. 1993 (1992) p. 42
Recycled ABS-polycarbonate blend and anodized aluminum
Manufactured by MAP (Merchants of Australian Products Pty., Ltd.), Australia
Lent by MAP, Melbourne

Enzo Mari. Italian, b. 1932
“Flores” Box. 1992 (1991) p. 28
Thermoplastic polymer
Manufactured by Danese S.r.l., Italy
Lent by Danese S.r.l., Grumello del Monte, Italy

Mazda Motor Corporation.
“MX5 Miata” Automobile Taillights. 1988 (1983) pp. 24-25 
Double-shot injection-molded acrylic-resin lens, injection-molded polypropylene reflector, and other materials
Manufactured by Mazda Motor Corporation, Japan
Lent by Mazda Motor Corporation, Irvine, Calif.

Paul Montgomery. American, b. 1959
Herbert Pfeiffer. German, b. 1949
“MouseMan® Cordless” Computer Pointing Device. 1993 (1993) p. 32
Injection-molded ABS
Manufactured by Logitech, Inc., United States
Lent by Logitech, Inc., Fremont, Calif.

Jasper Morrison. British, b. 1959
“Bottle” Storage Module. 1994 (1993) p. 29
Injection-molded polypropylene and anodized aluminum
Manufactured by Magis S.r.l., Italy
Lent by Magis S.r.l., Motta Livenza, Italy

Ninaber/Peters/Krouwel Industrial Design
Bruno Ninaber van Eyben. Dutch, b. 1950
Ruler. 1990 (1990) p. 31
Injection-molded Tampoprinted (pad-printed) ABS and evoprene elastomer
Manufactured by Randstad Uitzendbureau bv, The Netherlands
Lent by Ninaber/Peters/Krouwel Industrial Design, Leiden

Doug Patton. American, b. 1953
“Palm-Mate” Universal Remote Control. 1993 (1992)
ABS and acrylic
Manufactured by Go Video, Inc., United States
Lent by Go Video, Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz.

Pentagram Design
Daniel Weil. British, b. Argentina 1953
Compact-disk Packagings for Very and Very Relentless Albums by Pet Shop Boys. 1993 (1993) p. 26
Injection-molded polysterene
Manufactured by EMI Records, Great Britain
Lent by Pentagram Design, Ltd., London

Gordon Randall Perry. American, b. 1943
Richard Feinbloom. American, b. 1948
“ClearVision II” Hand-held Magnifiers. 1994 (1994) p. 34
Die-cast urethane and glass
Manufactured by Designs for Vision, Inc., United States
Lent by Gordon Randall Perry, New York

Gaetano Pesce. Italian, b. 1939
“Table Made with Music.” (1988) p. 27
Cured reactive-molded polyurethane-resin top surface and steel legs
Prototype by Bernini S.p.a., Italy
Lent by Bernini S.p.a., Carate Brianza, Italy
“Seaweed” Chair. (1991) p. 43
Resin-impregnated shredded fabrics
Prototype by Pesce, Ltd., United States
Lent by Peter Joseph Gallery, New York
Low Stools or Ottomans. (1994) p. 43
Resin-impregnated shredded fabrics
Prototype by Pesce, Ltd., United States
Lent by Ruth Shuman, New York

Purdue University
Steve Visser. American, b. 1959
Miro Tasic. American, b. 1968
Ashok Midha. Indian, b. 1946
“Compliers” Flexural Fishing Pliers. 1995 (1992) p. 35
Injection-molded Delrin®
Manufactured by Compliers, Inc., United States
Lent by Steve Visser, West Lafayette, Ind.

Sanford Redmond. American, b. 1924
“dispenSRpak” Packaging. 1987 (1986) p. 38
High-density polyethylene and other thermoplastics
Lent by Sanford Redmond, New York

Rollerblade Research and Development and Nordica S.p.a.
“Aeroblade® ABT®” In-line Skate. 1993 (1992) p. 36
BladeLite™ polyurethane shell, glass-reinforced nylon frame, foam padding, and other materials
Manufactured by Rollerblade, Inc., United States
Lent by Rollerblade, Inc., Minnetonka, Minn.

Mark Sanders. British, b. 1958
“No-Spill” Chopping Board. 1990 (1988) p. 31
Injection-molded polypropylene
Manufactured by Rubycliff, Ltd., Great Britain
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the designer

Studio X
Ross Lovegrove. British, b. 1958
“Figure of Eight” Side Chair. 1994 (1993) p. 30
Die-cast polyurethane seat, stainless-steel frame, and nylon feet
Manufactured by Cappellini S.p.a., Italy
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, gift of the manufacturer

Syn S.r.l.
Giorgio Gurioli. Italian, b. 1957
Francesco Scansetti. Italian, b. 1955
“Noce” Nutcracker. 1993 (1992) p. 34
Injection-molded glass-reinforced nylon
Manufactured by Outlook-Zelco Europe S.r.l., Italy
Lent by Zelco Industries, Inc., Mt. Vernon, N.Y.

TV and Video Systems Group Design Center
Seiji Kurokawa. Japanese, b. 1961
Fumitoshi Sakata. Japanese, b. 1958
Tetsuya Tsujimura. Japanese, b. 1966
“Twin Cam VL-MX7U” 8mm Video Camera. 1991 (1990)
Molded ABS, aluminum, and other materials
Manufactured by Sharp Corporation, Japan
Lent by Sharp Electronics Corporation, Mahwah, N.J.

Vent Design
Stephen Peart. British, b. 1958
“Enterprise” Earmounted Telephone Headset. 1993 (1993) p. 33
Injection-molded polycarbonate and stamped metal
Manufactured by Plantronics, Inc., United States
Lent by Plantronics, Inc., Santa Cruz

Yemm & Hart, Ltd.
“HDPE #2” Plastics. 1989 (1989)
Compression-molded recycled polyethylene
Manufactured by Yemm & Hart, Ltd., United States
Lent by Yemm & Hart, Ltd., Marquand, Mo.

Ziba Design
Kuni Masuda. Japanese
Mark Stella. American
Sohrab Vossoughi. Iranian
“World Class 300 Series” Fishing Reel. 1993 (1992) p. 36
Injection-molded glass-filled nylon and spun aluminum
Manufactured by Fenwick, Inc., United States
Lent by Fenwick, Inc., Huntington Beach, Calif.

References

Antonelli, P., ed. (1995). Mutant materials in contemporary design. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art, NY.

Antonelli, P., (1995). Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Museum of Modern art Web site: http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/1995/mutantmaterials/checklist.html


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Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Mutant materials in contemporary design | Paola Antonelli, editor | Museum of Modern Art, publisher | 1995 | PART 1

Mutant Materials in Contemporary DesignMutant Materials in Contemporary Design.  The book was printed in softcover and hardcover editions, with hardcover running well in excess of $100 at rare book outlets, probably because the covers are by Gaetano Pesce.  They are cheaper at amazon (I managed to snag one for $24).  Softcover can be had at amazon for $14 and up, but I had to do some digging to find one this reasonably priced.

Each cover of the hardcover edition, though mass-produced, is unique.  Polychrome resin is allowed to flow as it will as it casts on the cardboard, producing variegated combinations of color and transparency, thickness and shape.  The resin cover is not attached to the cardboard.  For more information about the the book, click here.

Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design was an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, shown from May 25 to August 27, 1995.  This book is the exhibition catalog.  It is 128 pages in length with 218 illustrations, 107 in color.

The exhibition was organized by Paola Antonelli.  She earned a master's degree in architecture from the Polytechnic of Milan in 1990.  From 1991 to 1993, she lectured in design history and theory at UCLA.  Antonelli joined the Museum of Modern Art in 1994.  An interview with Antonelli can be found here

Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design

One great thing about this exhibition is that it is available online, so click here or on the logo above to be taken to it.  Parts 2 and 3 of this post will focus on the objects in the “Plastics” and “Rubber and Foam” sections, though some of the other sections have items with polymeric components.  The exhibition was divided into the following sections:

Glass
Plastics
Wood
Fibers and Composites
Metals
Rubber and Foam
Ceramics
Other Materials

In the book, the section on plastic materials begins, “Plastics represent the distance that a century of technological progress has put between craftsmanship and industrialization.”  I like the quote.  Compare this exhibition with the “New Domestic Landscape” almost a quarter century earlier.  Not necessarily in content but in the materials represented.  Incredible developments in the polymer industry have given us an astonishing variety of objects.

Library of Congress Data
Library of Congress catalog card number 95-075535
ISBN 0-8109-6145-8 (Abrams softbound)
ISBN 0-87070-132-0 (MoMA/T&H softbound)
ISBN 0-87070-131-2 (MoMA special cover hardbound)

APA Citation
Antonelli, P., ed. (1995). Mutant materials in contemporary design. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art, NY.

Reference

Designboom, (2000, September). Paola Antonelli. Retrieved April 11, 2009, from Designboom Web site: http://www.designboom.com/eng/interview/antonelli.html


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Saturday, April 18, 2009

Pet Shop Boys “Very” compact disc case | Daniel Weil | Pentagram Design, United Kingdom | 1993

Daniel Weil / Pet Shop Boys Daniel Weil
Pentagram Design, United Kingdom, 1993

Daniel Weil was born in Argentina in 1953. He qualified in architecture from the University of Buenos Aires in 1977. He relocated to London to study industrial design at the Royal College of Art, where he received his MA (RCA) in 1981. Weil worked independently between 1982 to 1990 and between 1985 and 1991 was a partner in Weil and Taylor, London.

Weil joined Pentagram as a partner in 1992. His projects have included products, packaging, interiors, and art direction. He has implemented comprehensive design strategies for airline clients encompassing cabin interiors, seating, tableware, amenities, staff uniforms, check-in systems, and airport lounge interiors.

Weil was Professor of Industrial Design, Vehicle Design and Design Management at the Royal College of Art from 1991 to 1995. He was Unit Master at the Architectural Association from 1982 to 1986 and is a Senior Fellow of the Royal College of Art.  One of his most recent projects is packaging for Grey Goose vodka.

One of Weil’s early projects at Pentagram was the CD case for “Very” and “Very Relentless” by the UK electronic music group Pet Shop Boys (Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe).  This entry is more for Very, which might as well mean “Very identifiable.”  I remember going used-CD shopping in the mid 90s and you could immediately pick this one out of the stacks.  The case is made from brilliant orange injection molded polystyrene and manufactured by EMI Records, Great Britain.  The case was featured in the 1995 Museum of Modern Art exhibition “Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design.”  The link goes to the plastics section, but the exhibition was much more diverse.  The exhibition deserves a future post…so keep an eye out for it!

Pet Shop Boys, "Very"“Very” packaging designed by Daniel Weil.  Contents by Pet Shop Boys.

“Very” is the seventh album, the fifth of previously-unreleased music, by Pet Shop Boys.  It was released in 1993, going on to sell more than 5 million copies worldwide.  I would feel totally irresponsible if I didn’t give PSB their own picture marquee.  The headshot is from the Singles Collection album.  It always amused me.  And that album was delicious too!

Pet Shop Boys

The tracklist from “Very”:

  1. “Can you forgive her?” – 3:57
  2. “I wouldn't normally do this kind of thing” – 3:03
  3. “Liberation” – 4:05
  4. “A different point of view” – 3:24
  5. “Dreaming of the Queen” – 4:20
  6. “Yesterday, when I was mad” – 3:55
  7. “The theatre” – 5:10
  8. “One and one make five” – 3:30
  9. “To speak is a sin” – 4:45
  10. “Young offender” – 4:50
  11. “One in a million” – 3:52
  12. “Go West” – 5:00

+ “Postscript (I Believe In Ecstasy)” (Hidden track which starts at track-clock 7:07 of “Go West”) – 1:15

References

Antonelli, P., (1995). Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Museum of Modern art Web site: http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/1995/mutantmaterials/plastics.html

Pentagram, (2009). Daniel Weil. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Pentagram Web site: http://www.pentagram.com/en/partners/daniel-weil.php

Various Authors, (2009). Pet Shop Boys "Very" (album). Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Wikipedia Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Very_(album)


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Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Plateau Amuse Gueule | Yonel Lebovici | France | 1972


Yonel Lebovici PlateauYonel Lebovici
France, 1972

The following biography is excerpted from the exhibition and catalog of his work by Maison Gerard, October 1 - 26, 2007.  It was written by Barbara Deisroth, director of Sotheby’s 20th Century Decorative Works of Art Department.  The catalog is available here.  Am I the only one who thinks the Maxi light looks like an early generation iPod?

Yonel Lebovici, or Lebo as he was called by friends and family, was born in 1937 to Narcisse, a Romanian writer and Louise, his Breton-born mother.  As a young boy, his enthusiasm and delight for the arts including sculpting, painting and drawing was revealed as well as his abiding passion for collecting.  After receiving his baccalaureate in 1953 and a degree in aeronautics in 1955, he had a short stint at the aeronautics company SNCASE where he started his long and fruitful love of the light metal aluminum.  This was followed with work as a film extra test pilot and a career enhancing  job as a  be-bop dancer in Saint Germain des Prés; not the typical career path of a classically trained engineer.  But it did illustrate very clearly Lebo’s joyful approach to life.

With Lebovici’s early death at the age of 60 in 1998, we lost a great eye onto the world.

Lebovici said, “I do not like to be bored, or to bore others.  I love and want easy, pleasant playful things and of which the utility, in the end, will depend on the imagination and the desires of the individual.”

While many of the objects created by Lebovici are large and sculptural and metal, this entry is for the ABS plastic “Plateau amuse gueule.”  It is composed of 13 spheres in 26 hemispheres.  Twisting the central sphere around a simple central axis reveals 12 bowls.  It is not marked.

Half Plateau amuse gueule

Half Plateau amuse gueule

The Plateau taken apart into its two halves…

 

…and in operation.

As indicated by its name in French, the object is for serving appetizers or hors d’oeuvres.  It is 7.5 cm tall by 38 cm diameter and has a distinctly snowflaky molecular appearance.

15 square de Vergennes15 square de Vergennes, Paris has a permanent exhibition of Lebovici’s work.  A more detailed biography appears there as well.
 

White Plateau amuse gueule       White Plateau amuse gueule Plateau amuse gueule, white.  Images from eBay, item sold for $185.  Another recently sold for €183 ($240).

Orange Plateau amuse gueule      Orange Plateau amuse gueule  Plateau amuse gueule, orange.  Image source.  A similar example is for sale here with original box at €400 = $510.

Black Plateau amuse gueule         Black Plateau amuse gueule

My new to me Plateau amuse gueule, black.

Orange plateau amuse gueule with boxHere’s an image of the orange Plateau on top of the original box. Image source.  I’d like a better pic of the box to post if anyone has one and would like to share.

Chrome Plateau amuse gueuleThis is nothing short of awesome.  The entry indicates that it is made of metallized plastic.  From the exhibition at 15 square de Vergennes.

Selected Bibliography

L'Utopie Du Tout Plastique 1960 - 1973 Philippe Decelle, Diane Hennebert, Pierre Loze, L'Utopie Du Tout Plastique 1960 - 1973, 1994, p.111.

Yonel Lebovici, Sculpteur de haut niveau Michèle Chartier, Yonel Lebovici, Sculpteur de haut niveau, Editions Stein - Ouaki, Paris, 1995, p.48-49

Reference

Deisroth, B. (2007). Yonel Lebovici. Retrieved April 11, 2009, from Maison Gerard Web site: http://www.maisongerard.com/exhibitions/yonel_lebovici/


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Friday, April 10, 2009

Dark light | Jean Marie Massaud | Ligne Roset, France | 1999


Jean Marie Massaud Dark LightJean Marie Massaud
Ligne Roset, France, 1999

Dark LightThe Dark light table lamp by Jean Marie Massaud for Ligne Roset

Jean Marie Massaud was born in 1966 in Toulouse, France.  He graduated in 1990 from Les Ateliers, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Creation Industrielle (ENSCI, College of Industrial Arts) in Paris, France.

From a hansgrohe press release,

His collaboration with Marc Berthier and his work on town planning led him to meld design with architecture professionally. After creating the Studio Massaud with Daniel Pouzet in 2000, the pair developed such projects as the Tanabe House in Fukuoka, Japan.

Massaud has explored many different aspects of design: from industrial products to pieces of furniture.  Massaud also defines the architectural images of the Lancôme stores in Paris, New York and Hong Kong, and Renault’s booths at international auto shows.

His biggest architectural project to date was begun in 2004 and has been plagued by date opening setbacks: “Volcano,” the 45,500-seat football (s0ccer) stadium in Guadalajara, Mexico.

He is responsible for some absolutely stunning plastic designs.  One of my personal favorites is the 2005 Truffle seat for Porro, with or without base.  It lists at around $2,000.  Immediately reminded me of the Rougier tube lamp when I saw it at Domus (Atlanta). 

  Porro, green Porro, blackPorro, white 

Image Source:  designose.com, VIA.  VIA also has an exhibition of Massaud’s work here.

I don’t have a Truffle.  I don’t have the floor space!  But I do have the Dark light table lamp Massaud designed for Ligne Roset, which I actually got from Domus when I found one on sale there a couple of years ago.  I could not pass it up.  It’s no longer available from Ligne Roset.

Bulpren foamTexture of Bulpren Foam

The table lamp is 50 cm tall by 32 cm by 32 cm.  There is also a floor lamp version.  It has a steel base and stem finished in anodized aluminum.  The shade is in black, reticulated, entirely open-celled Bulpren foam that lets through only pinpricks of light.  Bulpren foam is made of polyurethane and more technical information can be found here.  It can be repeatedly shaken, washed, and rinsed and is very resilient to damage, so dusting is no problem even though it looks fragile.  Industrially, it is often used as a filter. 

Dark light, night Night view of Massaud’s Dark light.  It throws very cool patterns.

Dark light Another night shot, originally shot to show the Xes table (foreground), this picture does an equally nice job of putting the Dark light to scale (background).

Reference

O'Reilly, J. (2006). Always in search of the essential: The French designer Jean-Marie Massaud. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from hansgrohe USA Web site: http://www.hansgrohe-usa.com/cps/rde/xbcr//SID-3F57E8CC-9FBA0EA6/us_en/publications/US/Jean_Marie_Massaud_Bio_press.pdf


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Monday, April 6, 2009

Speak & Spell toy | Gene Frantz, et al. | Texas Instruments, United States of America | 1978

Speak & SpellPaul Breedlove
Richard Wiggins
Larry Brantingham
Gene Frantz
Texas Instruments, United States of America, 1978

Speak & Spell inventorsFrom Left to right, Frantz, Wiggins, Breedlove, and Brantingham.  Image source.

The Speak & Spell was an educational toy designed, developed, and sold by Texas Instruments. The toy consisted of a keyboard - made of 40 raised buttons on earlier models and a membrane on later models, a speech synthesizer, and a ROM cartridge slot. Development of the Speak & Spell began in 1976. The device was introduced at the summer Consumer Electronics Show in June, 1978.  By Christmas it was a hit, with a suggested retail price of $50.  It was vibrant orange plastic with yellow accents and a green vacuum fluorescent display.

E.T. The Extra Terrestrial The Speak & Spell became a pop culture phenomenon, eventually becoming an integral part of E.T.’s phone-home apparatus in the movie E.T.: The Extraterrestrial.  Filming began in 1981 and the movie was released in 1982.  Image source.   The DataMath Calculator Museum also has pictures of the inside of the Speak & Spell and a lot of other information.

Early Speak & Spell

An early version of the Speak & Spell from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The white top case is probably from the proof run for that part. Image source

Business Week coverBusiness Week cover, September 18, 1978.  Image source.

Four Texas Instruments personnel were instrumental in realizing the final Speak & Spell device: Paul Breedlove, Richard Wiggins, Larry Brantingham, and Gene Frantz. Breedlove originated the general product idea, Wiggins dealt with the voice processing, Brantingham was IC designer, and Frantz was responsible for overall case design, display, and operation.  An interview with Wiggins is available here.

Other similar toys followed in 1980 with a similar design, Speak & Math and Speak & Read.  Texas Instrument developed “Solid State Speech” for Speak & Spell.  It was the first low-cost, mass produced unit that electronically reproduced speech.

The Wikipedia article on the Speak & Spell has thorough and in depth coverage of the device, its history, and operation.  Old-computers.com also has an interesting treatment of the Speak & Spell.

Speak & SpellPhoto by Bill Bertram.  Image source.

Relive the joy of my (your) youth! A Speak & Spell simulator (called SASS) for Windows is available and can be downloaded here.  An online Speak & Spell simulator can be found here.

References

Edwards, B. (2008, December 16 ). 30 years later, Richard Wiggins talks Speak & Spell development. Retrieved April 1, 2009, from Vintage Computing Web site: http://www.vintagecomputing.com/index.php/archives/528

Texas Instruments, (2008). Speak & Spell™ introduced – first commercial use of DSP technology. Retrieved April 1, 2009, from Texas Instruments Web site: http://www.ti.com/corp/docs/company/history/timeline/eps/1970/docs/78-speak-spell_introduced.htm

Woerner, J. (2002, January 27). Inside a Speak & Spell. Retrieved April 5, 2009, from DataMath Web site: http://datamath.org/Story/Speak_Version.htm


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Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Pisellino cotton swabs holder | Stefano Giovannoni | Alessi, Italy | 2005


Stefano Giovannoni Pisellino Stefano Giovannoni
Alessi, Italy, 2005

Stefano Giovannoni was born in La Spezia, Italy in 1954. He graduated in Architecture in Florence in 1978. He lives and works in Milan. From 1979 to 1991, he taught and conducted research at the Florence Faculty of Architecture. He has been a master professor at Domus Academy in Milan, the Università del Progetto in Reggio Emilia, and professor of Industrial Design at the University of Architecture in Genova.

Interior designer, architect and teacher, Giovannoni is particularly well known in the field of industrial design. There is an endless list of major firms he has worked with in the design sector: Alessi, Deborah, Fiat, Flos, Helit, Henkel, Inda, Lavazza, Magis, Oregon Scientific, Seiko, Siemens, 3M, Toto and NTT Docomo, amongst others. The Girotondo and Mami series for Alessi, his plastic products, the Bagno Alessi and the “Bombo” series for Magis have made his name famous. Plastic is the element that characterizes much of Giovannoni’s work today. He explains, “Plastic is a very interesting material since it allows for extreme flexibility with regard to shape.”

Today, his creations form part of the permanent archive at the Georges Pompidou Centre and the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. His projects have received the Design Plus award at the Frankfurt Fair-Ambiente in 1994, 1996, and 2003; the 1997 100% Design award in London; the Forum Design Hannover award in 1999; and the ISH 2003 award.  He has had designs selected at Compasso d’Oro in 1996 and 1998.

Visit the web presence of Stefano Giovannoni here, which showcases many of his designs and his cv.

Pisselino catalog entryAlessi catalog entry for the Pisellino.

Pisellino promotional image Promotional image for the Pisellino.

While responsible for a wide array of designs, this entry is for the unique “Pisellino” designed for Alessi (designation SG77) in three colors, light green, blue, and orange,  in 2005.  Made of acrylic, the object is a delightful fancy, and a wonderful if not a little risque way to stow your cotton swabs.  Not so risque I didn’t give one to my mom for a gift, though.  Simply lift the swab-like cap on the head of the Pisellino to reveal a swab or nine, and also a “little” something else.  The method of storage is the same as the magic bunny toothpick holder.  Pisellino won’t take up much space in your bathroom (7 cm diameter by 15.5 cm height) but he will make quite an impact.  Still available from hivemodern at $32 and elsewhere as well.

Pisellino promotional image Image source:  Gadgetblog

References

Anonymous, (2006). People - Stefano Giovannoni. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from Demanio:re Web site: http://www.demaniore.com/opencms/opencms/eng_demanioRe/homePageSezione/magazine/personaggi/home/u1191251981480.html?breadCrumb=Detail

Anonymous, (2009). Featured Speaker - Stefano Giovannoni. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from DMI Conferences Web site: http://www.dmi.org/dmi/html/conference/europe09/sp_giovannoni.htm

Giovannoni, S. (2009). Giovannoni design. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from Giovannoni Design Web site: http://www.stefanogiovannoni.it/


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